More than 500 California Teachers Prepared by CalStateTEACH

(August 5, 2002) The latest graduates of California State University's innovative CalStateTEACH, an alternative teacher education program for elementary school teachers, boost the total number of teachers who have earned their teaching credentials through the program to more than 500. The students completing their programs during the 2001-2002 academic year number more than 300, 50 percent higher than those in CalStateTEACH's first year of graduates.

The 18-month CalStateTEACH program targets teachers on emergency credentials or waivers who need to complete a Multiple Subject Credential with emphasis on Cross-Cultural, Language, and Academic Development (CLAD), and are unable to attend a CSU campus on a regular basis because of work schedules, family obligations or distance from a CSU campus.

"The preparation of teachers in California has always been an integral part of the California State University's mission," noted CSU Chancellor Charles Reed, who helped launch the innovative outreach program in 1998, "and we are continuing that tradition in ways that will open the doors to a new generation of teachers."

CalStateTEACH provides a high quality education that combines independent study with on-line support and the latest in technology including Internet, video, and print materials. The coursework consists of assignments and activities that integrate their teaching experiences in the classroom. The flexibility of the program is designed to allow independent study at the time and place of the student's choice, which usually revolves around their teaching schedules. For additional support, students are assigned to one of four regional centers located at CSU Fresno, CSU Monterey Bay, CSU Fullerton, and Cal State L.A.

One great advantage of the program is that it delivers quality instruction to teachers who live in remote areas miles away from a CSU campus.

"The structure of CalStateTEACH as a distance education program may be the basis of teacher education in the future," said Jane Coover, a CalStateTEACH graduate from Mattole Unified in Humboldt County. "It has a challenging atmosphere that compels students to become self-motivated and directed."

Approximately 38,000 teachers in California are not fully credentialed, but hold either a waiver or an emergency permit. The CSU educates 60 percent of the state's teachers, and CalStateTEACH is one of the many initiatives CSU has implemented in recent years to improve the quality and quantity of California's teachers. See www.calstateteach.com for further information.

The California State University is the largest system of senior higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, nearly 400,000 students and 42,000 faculty and staff. Since the system was created in 1961, it has awarded about 2 million degrees. The CSU is renowned for the quality of its teaching and for the job-ready graduates it produces. Its mission is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of the people of California. With its commitment to excellence, diversity and innovation, the CSU is the university system that is working for California. See www.calstate.edu for more information.

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Last Updated: 5 August 2002

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